Category Archives: Finished 2015

‘Strippy Steps’ is Finished!

Finally finished it. This one was begun on the Ballan Retreat and adapted from a class pattern by Pauline Baber at Patchworks Unlimited.

Kaffe Fasset fabrics

Strip sets laid out on the floor.

Varying widths of strips of Kaffe Fasset fabrics were sewn to a wash away interfacing, using the flip and sew method. Trimmed back to a uniform rectangular shape, the original pattern had them laid out in a chevron row. I thought it could have a better visual design by staggering the blocks, so laid them out on the floor. You know when you get that niggly feeling that it’s not quite right, (that’s usually when a project goes into the UFO pile), so I walked around it, and then went away from it for a while.

A fellow Pascoe Patcher (Sue C)’s passing comment, about Kaffe Fasset fabrics always looking good against black, led to the ‘aha’ moment! So off to the Millrose Cottage next door for some black fabric. So that’s where it stopped at Retreat.

Back home, of course work and normal activity slows down the sewing so it took a while to get back to working on this project (amongst others). How far apart to separate the rectangles, and stagger them up or down, was decided by using Jinny Beyers Golden Gauge Calipers – what a neat gadget. It takes the guess work out of proportions and consequently there is no subconscious niggle when viewing the quilt, that the spacing is not quite right.

Golden Gauge Calipers

Jinny Beyer’s Golden Gauge Calipers

Added a small rectangle to the top or bottom of each rectangle, then a sashing in between to join them together, followed by a border all around. As it is a dark top, a grey wadding/batting was needed.

'Strippy Steps' 02

Grey wadding for the dark top instead of white.

What quilting design to use for this piece was a challenge. With a strong geometric and straight line pattern nothing curved or floral would suit it, so what to do? As Deb Layt says, ‘Let the quilt tell you’, so over a few days of just looking at it came the decision to extend some of the straight lines from the stripes out to the edges. Along the top border going in one direction, and on the lower border, going the opposite direction with nothing crossing over.

'Strippy Steps' 06

Bohn Chalk Pencil, small ruler, and fabric eraser.

Using a chalk pencil to mark the quilt, and sewing with Wonderfil’s Spagetti 12wt black thread on a black fabric, even under lights, takes concentration.

Marking a quilt top

Chalk quilting lines.

Binding done … and it’s finished! Although originally a table runner, DH thought it looked better as a wall hanging – so now there’s a hanging sleeve to put on – if only he had said that before I did the binding! Anyway, it’s another one to tick off the list!

'Strippy Steps'  is finished

Completed quilt.

I rather like this one, bright and bold, hope you do too.


‘Crooked Path’ – ’tis finished!

Time to get back to what’s been happening with the ‘Crooked Path’ table runner. It took some time to get used to the Westalee template and ruler foot, as I found it easier to do them a few at a time, and not be ambitious in ‘getting it all done now!’ I improved over time, gradually getting the hang of it, and can see how it fits in between using a walking foot and free motion quilting.

Crooked Path

Completed quilting with the Westalee ruler foot ‘Spin-e-fex’ motif.

I needed to unpick a few of the ‘petals’ that had got ‘squished’, and a couple of the inner circles (that are formed as the template turns around on the pin), as they were more like mountains and valleys. With persistence each square patch had the pattern quilted on it. However a few of the circles were still a bit wobbly, which I would notice but others may not – and I was over the unpicking, so what to do? Simple, appliqué a circle over the centre of each square! After all it does look like a ‘flower’.

Crooked Path

Centre circles – colour choices.

After auditioning fabrics from the stash, it came down to only a couple of pieces. The strong pattern of the squares, along with the yellow background and contrasting red, clashed with so many choices. So these were it. Next was what sizes and which colour to put where – and another day went by.

Crooked Path

Inner circles glued down ready for appliqué

‘Roxanne Glue Baste It’ kept the circles in place until I had time to start the appliqué. I chose to use a matching thread and a narrow zig zag on the Bernina 801.

Crooked Path

‘Crooked Path’ appliquéd centres.

An unexpected effect was that the circles tended to ‘puff’ up – possibly due to all the quilting underneath them, flattening the lower layers.

Crooked Path

Crooked Path

Well, ‘Crooked Path’ began as a pattern for International Quilt Day (seen by chance while wandering the web), and ended up as a gift for a special lady. I’ve enjoyed making this table runner, juggling the choices along the way. And it’s sooooo good, knowing that I’ve actually finished something – and on time – instead of it going into the bottomless pit of ‘UFO’s’!

I hope you too are joining me in this slow journey, and stitching to ‘get it finished’!




‘Floating Duo’

Another very easy to construct table runner is finished! The rich fabric pattern is set simply against a navy background, but what gives it a bit of a zing is the bright green binding. Quilting was a breeze, two lines in the background from end to end making a shape around the small patches. What I learnt with this project, was about quilt labels. In the Victorian Quilters handbook, there is a suggestion as to where to put labels on the back of a quilt. Apparently they go on the bottom left hand corner as you stand and face the back of the quilt. So from now on, that’s where the labels will go!

'Floating Duo'

‘Floating Duo’

Where do you put your quilt labels?


‘Pink Peptides’

Naming quilts seems to be a quirky business. Often patchwork quilters give their quilts sssa title by:

  • naming them after a family member
  • naming them after a pet
  • using the name of a traditional block with a colour
  • using a favourite location
  • a reminder of the past
  • connecting with nature
  • putting a pin in a dictionary …
  • keeping a list and ticking them off when used

The title of this quilt came about because DH was watching the science based ABC television program ‘Catalyst’. The segment based around ‘Plant based medicines’ illustrated the difference between normal and circular peptides. In his view the open ends of the zig-zag in the pattern reminded him of the peptides!

Pink Peptides

‘Pink Peptides’

This quilt is from the January ‘Mystery Quilt’ class at PU. As other PP’s compete their tops, I’ll post them here. It will be interesting to see how their quilts turn out with their choice of colours. I wonder how my PP’s and others name their quilts?