Monthly Archives: March 2015

What will you be Quilting on March 21?

March 21st (2015) is ‘National Quilting Day’, first begun by ‘The National Quilting Association, Inc.,’ in 1992, which has’ grown into a global celebration for all quilt makers and quilt lovers.’

National Quilters

The third Saturday in March every year unites quilters and ‘gives recognition to the special art form’.

How will you be celebrating ‘(Inter)National Quilt Day’? Will you be making this year’s project “Crooked Path’ by Denniele Bohannon?

Crooked Path

I’ve picked some small pieces of stash fabrics, to make a small ‘Crooked Path’, table runner for a special lady in my life – DML. Check back later to see how it turns out.

Fabrics for 'Crooked Path'

Fabrics for ‘Crooked Path’

So , how will you celebrate your craft?

To read more about National Quilt Day, visit here.

How do we celebrate our amazing quilters?

I came across an article about Sue (Gruber) Poser, being awarded the 2015 Quilter of the Year for Minnesota Quilters Inc., and it started me wondering about how patchworkers recognise the inspirational leaders of their craft.

Hero

An individual’s work is shared at local guild, State, or National exhibitions. Work can be recognised by a Viewer’s Choice, or judged entry. Sometimes an award is made in honour of a past member.

A solo exhibition can highlight the body of work by an outstanding quilter, at an exhibition, or in an art gallery, or museum.

However, being named ‘Quilter of the Year’ is aligned to the person, not an item, and this celebrates both their work and their contribution to the craft.

Does your State or local guild celebrate a member? Annually, or biannually? Is  common criteria used and shared between guilds?

Read the full newspaper article here, or visit the website for ‘Gruber’s Quilt Shop’ here.

photo credit: Letterpress Hero via photopin (license)

Salamander: Applique

Now that the edges are turned, I use a dab of ‘Roxanne Glue-Baste-It’ on seam allowance and each ‘twirl’ of seams. It washes out and only a tiny amount is needed to hold the block in place.

Dabs of glue on half of the block.

Dabs of glue on half of the block.

By carefully flipping this half over onto the background and carefully smoothing out the fabric, it is easy to check that no seams have been twisted in the process. The second half is then temporarily stuck down.

Threads for applique.

Threads for applique.

I love using Aurafil 50wt threads for appliqué, they are fine and blend well with the top fabric. This is my personal preference, as I have tried using the silk threads, but dealing with a thread that is almost invisible to see when stitching, and has a life of it’s own, is not for me. What are your favourite appliqué threads?

Hand stitching is usually at night, under a daylight, while watching something on the ‘box’. Hence the stitching is not always perfect, and even if there is no such thing as the ‘Quilt Police’, I at least aim for a consistency that I am happy with. I’ve given up trying to get them straight and have settled for bumpy bits. I do so admire the many women from the past who  stitched without electricity to light their work!

Applique as seen from the back.

Applique as seen from the back.

Back to stitching!

Salamander: Turned Edge

Time to update what’s happening with the ‘Salamander’ Patchwork of the Crosses runner. Now that the three hand pieced blocks are finished, it’s time to turn the edges ready for hand appliqué to the background. All seams are ironed into a rotating ‘whirligig’ pattern, beginning from the centre of the block. This helps avoid a ‘hill’ of fabric at the ‘Y’ join, so the block lays flat.

Salamander seams

Salamander seams

The tools I use for this turned edge technique include a timber board covered with an old tea towel; ‘Mary Ellen’s Best Press’; the ‘Appliquick’ tools, and a Clover mini-iron.

Tools for the turned edge technique.

Tools for the turned edge technique.

The edges of the block are sprayed a few at a time, and using fingers and the Appliquick, the edges are folded back on the seam allowance line, and ironed to a crisp crease.

Spray, turn, iron.

Spray, turn, iron.

Turned edges.

Turned edges.

Using a domestic iron, a final press dries all the spray and firms the turned edge ready for stitching down.

Final iron with domestic iron.

Final iron with domestic iron.

However, there are occaisional ‘rabbit ears’ two or three threads in thickness that will stick out past the edge of the seam allowance on some corners, depending on how it was folded.

Mini 'rabbit ears' sticking out.

Mini ‘rabbit ears’ sticking out.

When appliquéing the block to the background, that little ‘ear’ is tucked back in at a 45 degree angle using the sewing needle, as the block is stitched down.

Tucked ears ready to appliqué.

Tucked ears ready to appliqué.

Drop by later for another ‘Salamander’ post about the next step – appliqué.